Program requirements for the different fields of concentration

 

Program requirements: Power Engineering (ET)

Within the Bachelor Programme in Electrical Engineering, Information Technology and Computer Engineering, the specialization in Electrical Power Engineering aims to provide students with the systematic understanding of key aspects of Electrical Power Engineering and that of related disciplines, including the underlying mathematics and physics, modelling and analysis as well as synthesis methods. It is expected that students with a Bachelor diploma have acquired a basic knowledge of the technical practice methods in design, modelling and research in Electrical Power Engineering.

Graduates are able to understand the necessary fundamental knowledge ofElectrical Power Engineering as well as the methods and practical technical applications common in this field. Using knowledge acquired in lectures as well as experience gathered in exercises, graduates distinguish models for Power Systems and their components in order to solve technical-scientific questions. They are able to synthesize theoretical knowledge and learn important modelling methods. Graduates gathered experience in expressing and solving specific problems as well as in developing awareness of the interdisciplinary dimensions and implications of their work especially in Electrical Power Engineering. Upon graduation, students are able to distinguish and reflect the importance of a reliable and safe electricity supply.

In order to achieve these goals, the Programme utilizes the following teaching and research forms:

  • Lectures – a serial presentation of material including the treatment of specific methodologies
  • Tutorials – the solidifying and deepening of expert knowledge and capabilities by solving problems associated with lecture material
  • Laboratory exercises – small working groups elaborate and work on given tasks such as measurements, testing and programming for a limited period of time and give written summary of their results
  • Seminar work – the elaboration of complex questions and scientific knowledge. Basic knowledge is presupposed. Students give oral presentations in the seminar
  • Projects – Small working groups elaborate and work on complex problems for a limited period of time and give written and oral presentations of their results
  • Excursions – expert guided tours of technical installations and facilities outside the university
  • Intensive Courses – compact intensive courses composed of lectures and tutorials.

The Programme is divided into compulsory subjects, which serve to provide students with the most important fundamental theoretical knowledge, and required electives, which allow students to specialize in a particular area. Students devote a part of their workload to general education subjects relevant for the engineering profession such as law, economics and management. The knowledge acquired in lectures and tutorials is normally tested in written (occasionally oral) examinations, while students achieve accreditation for seminars, projects and laboratory exercises. Group work in projects and presentation in seminars is also intended to enhance their interdisciplinary and social skills. Students must independently complete a bachelor’s thesis (three months); these are normally in an area of specialization and often part of a larger research project.

 

Program requirements: Micro- and Nanoelectronics (ME)

Within the Bachelor Programme in Electrical Engineering, Information Technology and Computer Engineering, the specialization in Micro- and Nanoelectronics aims to provide students with the systematic understanding of key aspects of Micro- and Nanoelectronics, including the underlying mathematics and physics, modelling and analysis as well as synthesis methods. Students with a Bachelor degree in Electrical Engineering, Information Technology and Computer Engineering and this specialization have acquired a basic knowledge of the technical practice methods in design, modelling and research in micro- and nanoelectronics.


Graduates are able to understand the necessary fundamental knowledge of Micro- and Nanoelectronics as well as the methods and practical technical applications common in this field. Using knowledge acquired in lectures as well as experience gathered in exercises, graduates can distinguish models for micro- and nanoelectronic systems and their components in order to solve technical-scientific questions. They are able to synthesize theoretical knowledge and learn important modelling methods. Graduates gathered experience in expressing and solving specific problems as well as in developing awareness of the interdisciplinary dimensions and implications of their work especially in Micro- and Nanoelectronics.


Upon graduation, students have a first understanding about

  • the fundamental knowledge on modern technologies for fabrication of integrated circuits and microsystems
  • different design styles and design methods for the design of integrated systems
  • interactions of particular design levels and design abstractions

In order to achieve these goals, the Programme utilizes the following teaching and research forms:

  • Lectures – a serial presentation of material including the treatment of specific methodologies
  • Tutorials – the solidifying and deepening of expert knowledge and capabilities by solving problems associated with lecture material
  • Laboratory exercises – small working groups elaborate and work on given tasks such as measurements, testing and programming for a limited period of time and give written summary of their results
  • Seminar work – the elaboration of complex questions and scientific knowledge. Basic knowledge is presupposed. Students give oral presentations in the seminar
  • Projects – Small working groups elaborate and work on complex problems for a limited period of time and give written and oral presentations of their results
  • Excursions – expert guided tours of technical installations and facilities outside the university
  • Intensive Courses – compact intensive courses composed of lectures and tutorials.

The Programme is divided into compulsory subjects, which serve to provide students with the most important fundamental theoretical knowledge, and required electives, which allow students to specialize in a particular area. Students devote a part of their workload to general education subjects relevant for the engineering profession such as law, economics and management. The knowledge acquired in lectures and tutorials is normally tested in written (occasionally oral) examinations, while students achieve accreditation for seminars, projects and laboratory exercises. Group work in projects and presentation in seminars is also intended to enhance their interdisciplinary and social skills. Students must independently complete a bachelor’s thesis (three months); these are normally in an area of specialization and often part of a larger research project.

 

Program requirements: Information- and Communication Technology (IC)

The field of "Informations und Kommunikationstechnik” (Information and Communications Technology) is dominated by the progress in the areas of information theory, information and communication technology, microelectronics and their various applications, such as communication networks, mobile radio systems, optical transmission systems, signal processing systems (image/video, speech/audio), automation, medical systems, robotics, automotive and embedded systems. As required by the increasing complexity in the denoted areas, RWTH graduates with a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering, Information Technology and Computer Engineering and a specialization in Information and Communications Technology have gained knowledge in classical electrical engineering and computer science, communication technology, and are able to contribute to system development by a hardware/software co-design approach. They have obtained basic knowledge in modelling, analysis and optimization of such systems. The degree involves a first understanding about

  • the necessary fundamental knowledge of this field;
  • the methods and practical technical applications common in this field;
  • synthesizing theoretical knowledge and learning modelling methods;
  • the way how engineers typically approach and solve specific problems;
  • developing awareness of the interdisciplinary dimensions and implications of their work.

In order to achieve these goals, the Programme utilizes the following teaching and research forms:

  • Lectures – a serial presentation of material including the treatment of specific methodologies
  • Tutorials – the solidifying and deepening of expert knowledge and capabilities by solving problems associated with lecture material
  • Laboratory exercises – small working groups elaborate and work on given tasks such as measurements, testing and programming for a limited period of time and give written summary of their results
  • Seminar work – the elaboration of complex questions and scientific knowledge. Basic knowledge is presupposed. Students give oral presentations in the seminar
  • Projects – Small working groups elaborate and work on complex problems for a limited period of time and give written and oral presentations of their results
  • Excursions – expert guided tours of technical installations and facilities outside the university
  • Intensive Courses – compact intensive courses composed of lectures and tutorials.

The Programme is divided into compulsory subjects, which serve to provide students with the most important fundamental theoretical knowledge, and required electives, which allow students to specialize in a particular area. Students devote a part of their workload to general education subjects relevant for the engineering profession such as law, economics and management. The knowledge acquired in lectures and tutorials is normally tested in written (occasionally oral) examinations, while students achieve accreditation for seminars, projects and laboratory exercises. Group work in projects and presentation in seminars is also intended to enhance their interdisciplinary and social skills. Students must independently complete a bachelor’s thesis (three months); these are normally in an area of specialization and often part of a larger research project.

 

Program requirements: Computer Engineering (CE)

Graduates from the Bachelor Programme in Electrical Engineering, Information Technology and Computer Engineering with a specialization in the field “Technische Informatik” (Computer Engineering) have acquired a basic understanding of key aspects in the areas of computer technology, information and communication technology. Furthermore, they have acquired initial knowledge in at least one application field, such as computer systems, media systems (image/video, speech/audio, graphics), automation, medical systems, robotics, where they have of technical practice methods in design, modelling and research in this selected domain. This involves a first understanding about

  • the necessary fundamental knowledge of this field;
  • the methods and practical technical applications common in this field;
  • synthesizing theoretical knowledge and learning modelling methods;
  • the way how engineers typically approach and solve specific problems;
  • developing awareness of the interdisciplinary dimensions and implications of their work.

In order to achieve these goals, the Programme utilizes the following teaching and research forms:

  • Lectures – a serial presentation of material including the treatment of specific methodologies
  • Tutorials – the solidifying and deepening of expert knowledge and capabilities by solving problems associated with lecture material
  • Laboratory exercises – small working groups elaborate and work on given tasks such as measurements, testing and programming for a limited period of time and give written summary of their results
  • Seminar work – the elaboration of complex questions and scientific knowledge. Basic knowledge is presupposed. Students give oral presentations in the seminar
  • Projects – Small working groups elaborate and work on complex problems for a limited period of time and give written and oral presentations of their results
  • Excursions – expert guided tours of technical installations and facilities outside the university
  • Intensive Courses – compact intensive courses composed of lectures and tutorials.

The Programme is divided into compulsory subjects, which serve to provide students with the most important fundamental theoretical knowledge, and required electives, which allow students to specialize in a particular area. Students devote a part of their workload to general education subjects relevant for the engineering profession such as law, economics and management. The knowledge acquired in lectures and tutorials is normally tested in written (occasionally oral) examinations, while students achieve accreditation for seminars, projects and laboratory exercises. Group work in projects and presentation in seminars is also intended to enhance their interdisciplinary and social skills. Students must independently complete a bachelor’s thesis (three months); these are normally in an area of specialization and often part of a larger research project.

 

Program requirements: Biomedical Engineering (BMT)

Graduates from the Bachelor Programme in Electrical Engineering, Information Technology and Computer Engineering with a specialization in the field “Biomedizinische Technik” (Biomedical Engineering) have acquired a basic understanding of key aspects in the areas of electrical engineering applied to biomedical engineering devices and medical systems.
As required by the increasing complexity in the field of biomedical engineering, RWTH graduates with a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering, Information Technology and Computer Engineering and a specialization in Biomedical Engineering have gained knowledge in classical electrical engineering and computer science, communication technology, and are able to contribute to system development (both on the hardware and software level) for medical applications. Furthermore, graduates have acquired initial knowledge in medical application areas by being introduced to basic concepts of physiology and anatomy.


This involves a first understanding about

  • the necessary fundamental knowledge of this field;
  • the methods and practical technical applications common in this field;
  • synthesizing theoretical knowledge and learning modelling methods;
  • the way how engineers typically approach and solve specific problems in medicine;
  • developing awareness of the interdisciplinary dimensions and implications of their work.

In order to achieve these goals, the Programme utilizes the following teaching and research forms:

  • Lectures – a serial presentation of material including the treatment of specific methodologies
  • Tutorials – the solidifying and deepening of expert knowledge and capabilities by solving problems associated with lecture material
  • Laboratory exercises – small working groups elaborate and work on given tasks such as measurements, testing and programming for a limited period of time and give written summary of their results
  • Seminar work – the elaboration of complex questions and scientific knowledge. Basic knowledge is presupposed. Students give oral presentations in the seminar
  • Projects – Small working groups elaborate and work on complex problems for a limited period of time and give written and oral presentations of their results
  • Excursions – expert guided tours of technical installations and facilities outside the university
  • Intensive Courses – compact intensive courses composed of lectures and tutorials.

The Programme is divided into compulsory subjects, which serve to provide students with the most important fundamental theoretical knowledge, and required electives, which allow students to specialize in a particular area. Students devote a part of their workload to general education subjects relevant for the engineering profession such as law, economics and management. The knowledge acquired in lectures and tutorials is normally tested in written (occasionally oral) examinations, while students achieve accreditation for seminars, projects and laboratory exercises. Group work in projects and presentation in seminars is also intended to enhance their interdisciplinary and social skills. Students must independently complete a bachelor’s thesis (three months); these are normally in an area of specialization and often part of a larger research project.