Catalogue Study program Micro- and Nanoelectronics WS18/19 onwards

 

Lists of modules of the current semester (link will follow)

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This catalogue is not complete yet, but will be updated shortly!

 

Micro- and Nanoelectronics: Catalogue CORE (16 Credits required)

Compound Semiconductors and Optical Components

Content:

Starting from basic knowledge on electronic materials and silicon based devices, the students will acquire in depth knowledge on modern compound semiconductor devices for high speed and optical applications. The fundamental properties setting III-V compound semiconductors and SiC apart from silicon will be discussed and the unique functional structures which can be realized will be covered.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

High Frequency Electronics

Content:

High Frequency Electronics instructs the design and basic aspects of RF nonlinear circuits.

Starting with the basics:

  • Analytic models of nonlinear circuits
  • Taylor, Voltera, nonlinear Fourier, parametric calculation

Futher focus on:

  • Large signal linear PA behaviour
  • SMAPs
  • wideband PAs
  • parametrics amplifiers
  • frequency converters, frequency multipliers
  • oscillators
  • RP switches

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Solid-State Technology

Content:

  • Basic and advanced aspects of semiconductor process technology including oxidation, lithography, wet chemical etching, plasma processes, diffusion, doping, implantation, thin film deposition etc.
  • CMOS/VLSI process integration
  • Analytical methods such as ellipsometry, microscopy, photoluminescence etc.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

VLSI Design for Digital Signal Processing - Fundamentals

Content:

  • VLSI fundamentals of the nano-scale CMOS technologies,
  • Transistor properties, 
  • Variability, 
  • Parasitic elements, 
  • Line parameters, 
  • CMOS basic circuits, 
  • Time response, 
  • Power loss and energy requirement 
  • Scaling, 
  • Parallelization and multiple use, 
  • Pipelining, 
  • Main features of quantitative optimization, 
  • Interaction between the design levels, 
  • Equivalence transformations

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

 

Micro- and Nanoelectronics: Catalogue ELECTIVE (24 Credits required)

Chemical Sensors and Actuators in Silicon Technology

Content:

The lecture “Silicon-based Sensor and Actuator Systems” deals with the conception and the manufacturing methods of microsystems based on silicon fabrication technologies.

A microsystem is the combination of sensors, actuators and signal processing to a functional unit with structural dimensions in the micrometer range. To achieve this goal, methods of silicon technologies are applied. This allows benefiting from the large experience in microelectronics and ensures compatibility.

The second part of the lecture “Silicon-based Sensor and Actuator Systems” addresses operating principles and the technical realization of chemical sensors implemented in silicon microtechnology, as e.g. pellistors, metal oxide gas sensors or so called “artificial noses”. Further topics are micro fluidics, micro reaction technology and simulation of microsystems.

Fundamental challenges of microsystem technology, for example interfaces to the macroscopic world, are discussed in the second half of the semester. The emphasis here lies on mounting and packaging of microsystems. Therefore, different methods of die attachments, reliability and test of microsystems and advanced (e.g. 3-dimensional) packaging are presented.

Presentation of the lecture:

  • Gas Sensors: Definition, applications, evaluation criteria, pellistors, semiconducting metal oxid sensors, mass sensitive sensors, MOSFET based sensors, concept of electronic noses
  • Bio/chemical Sensors: Basics of electrochemistry, sensors for measuring material concentrations in liquids, bio sensors, gene chips
  • Micro Actuators: Thermal, electrostatic, piezoelectric and electromagnetic drives
  • Micro fluidics and micro reaction technology: Scale based effects, surface functionalization, production of micro fluidic systems, micro valves, pumps and mixers, transport of fluids, dispenser, micro reaction technology
  • Finite Element Method: Basics, examples
  • Fundamentals of geometrical optics and wave optics: Optical refraction and reflection, wave optics, fourier optics, spectrometers
  • OptoMEMs: Optical fibers, micro lenses, Fresnel zone plate, micro mirrors (DMD, SLM), planar mirrors
  • Nanotechnology and Nanosystems: Microscopes (STM, SFM), properties, CNTs
  • Sensor Packaging: Packaging possibilities, wafer bond techniques, sensor housing, chip on board packages, interface to environment
  • Test and Reliability: Quality assurance, stress factors, accelerated safety tests

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Compound Semiconductors: Electronic, Photonic and Application

Content:

  • Physical properties of III-V semiconductors and semiconductor nanostructures
  • Comparison with silicon and other compound semiconductors
  • Metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor junctions
  • Crystal growth and epitaxy

Characterization of material and devices, new applicatio

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Compound Semiconductors: Physics, Technology and Application

Content:

  • Semiconductor physics in new (opto-)electronic devices (FET, HBT, LED, LASER, solar cells)
  • Technology of semiconductor devices
  • AC and DC behavior of transistors (MOSFET, HFET, HBT)
  • Material and device measurement techniques
  • Typical circuits and industrial applications are analyzed.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Computer Arithmetic: Advanced Topics

Content:

  • CORDIC algorithm,
  • Galois field arithmetics, 
  • Error detecting and error tolerating arithmetic, 
  • Linear transformations, 
  • DFT and FFT, 
  • DCT and FDCT, 
  • Applications in digital signal processing, especailly in channel coding

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Computer Arithmetic: Fundamentals

Content:

  • Arithmetic standard operations,
  • addition,
  • Subtraction,
  • Comparators,
  • Sorters, 
  • Multiplication, 
  • division, 
  • non-redundant vs. redundant arithmetics, 
  • Residue class arithmetics, 
  • Elementary arithmetic functions, 
  • Algebraic elementary operations, 
  • Root extraction, 
  • Polynom approximation

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Electronic and Optical Measurement Technologies

Content:

The fundamental principles and the functionalities and non-idealities of essential electronic building blocks for the measurement of electrical quantities will be explained, as well as their application to the measurement of ultra-small and ultra-fast signals illustrated with concrete systems. Optical measurement techniques relying on similar principles implemented in the optical domain will also be introduced, in particular in the context of extending the limitations of purely electrical systems.

Numerical examples based on Simulink will be exemplified during the exercise sessions.

In particular, following topics will be covered:

Basics of electrical measurement techniques:

  • Noise in electrical amplifiers (Johnson-Nyquist noise, operational amplifiers, lock-in amplifiers, 50 systems and noise figure).
  • Digitalization (A/D and D/A converters, Sigma-Delta converters, digitization noise).
  • Frequency and real-time measurements (frequency references, phase locked loops, phase noise, spectrally resolved measurements).
  • Architecture of S-parameter analyzers and high-speed oscilloscopes.

Optical measurement techniques and microwave photonics:

  • Signal processing with electrical-optical-electrical circuits.
  • Measurements based on pulsed light sources and frequency combs.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Electronic Noise in Devices and Circuits

Content:

  • N port theory (parameter representations, transformations, reciprocity, Norton equivalents)
  • Scattering parameters (scattering matrices, wave sources, scattering transfer parameters)
  • Basic facts about noise (power spectral density, Wiener-Khintschin theorem, Wiener-Lee theorem, electronic noise, noisy 2-ports, shot noise, Johnson-Nyquist noise, general noise, noise measurement)
  • Gain definitions and stability (gain definitions, unilateralization, stability criteria)
  • Noise in devices (impedance field method, noise models for diodes, BJTs and MOSFETs) 
  • Noise in circuits (circuit level calculation of noise, noise figure)

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Fabrication and Characterization of Nanoelectronic Devices and Circuits

Content:

Students will actively fabricate in a cleanroom their own silicon chip with micro-/nanoscale CMOS devices. The transistors will be concatenated to form simple building blocks of logic circuits such as inverters, NAND gates and a half-adder. The impact of the fabrication technology and the design of the devices on the circuit performance and the power consumption will be investigated.

Creidts: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Fundamentals of Organic Electronics and Optoelectronics Technology and Applications

Content:

Building on the basics of electronic devices and materials, a detailed review on the interesting topic of organic semiconductors (SC) is given. Besides basic properties of organic SC and their technology (fabrication, deposition, processing), main differences to inorganic SC and novel concepts are highlighted. Large parts are dedicated to the application fields of organic electronic circuits, organic and hybrid organic photovoltaics (OPV / HOPV) as well as organic light emitting diodes (OLED).

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

GaN: Material, Technology and Devices

Content:

Based on previously acquired basic knowledge on semiconductor material and devices, the course introduces the basic field of group III nitride semiconductors. In particular, fundamental differences to conventional semiconductor materials and devices are discussed in detail, covering:

  • crystal and band structure, electrical and optical properties
  • heterostructures, polarization, transport in bulk and 2-dimensional systems
  • crystal fabrication and growth
  • process technology for electronic and optoelectronic devices
  • fundamentals of Ga-based transistors and light emitting diodes
  • applications in RF and power electronics.

Additionaly research topics covering the current physical and technological challenges will be addressed

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Metrology - Analytical methods for semiconductor characterization

Content:

Crystal structure of solids

- Fundamentals of ion, electron and photon interaction with solids

- Analytical techniques that are commonly used in the characterization of semiconductors, such as:

  • Scanning Electron Micropscopy (SEM)
  • Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)/Field Emission Microscopy (FEM
  • Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM)
  • X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS)
  • Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy (UPS)
  • X-ray Diffraction (XRD)/ X Ray Reflectivity (XRR)
  • Raman Spectroscopy/ Photoluminescence (PL)/Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)
  • Ellipsometry
  • Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES)
  • Rutherford Backscattering (RBS)
  • Ultra Violet – Near Infra Red (UV-NIR) spectroscopy
  • Fourier Transform Infra Red spectroscopy (FTIR)
  • Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS)
  • Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) / Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED)/ Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED)
  • X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES)
  • Second Harmonic Generation (SHG)
  • Scanning Photocurrent Microscopy (SPCM)

Credits: 4           Contact hours per week: 3

Microfluidic Systems - Bio-MEMS

Content:

Microfluidics is a branch of micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) where small volumes (10-9 – 10-18 l) liquids are manipulated in microchannels, When microfluidic systems are used in biological or biochemical applications; they are called Bio-MEMS. Examples are e.g. miniaturized multifunctional bioanalytical or biochemical labors on single chips. In the lecture “Microfluidic Systems – Bio-MEMS” basics of microfluidic systems will be introduced. The lecture shows that polymer-based microsystems are a competitive alternative to silicon-based microsystems. Up-to-date microfluidic systems and research fields are introduced.

The topics of the lecture:

  • Introduction and basics of fluids
  • Fabrication technologies
  • Fluid mechanics for microfluidic systems, application of Navier-Stokes equation
  • Pressure-driven microfluidic systems: valves, pumps
  • Diffusion and mixing in microfluidic channels
  • Surface tension, capillary effect
  • Paper-based microfluidics
  • Droplets in microchannels
  • Digital microfluidic systems (electrowetting)
  • Electrokinetics: Electroosmosis, electrophoresis, dielectrophoresis
  • Microfluidics and magnetism
  • Microelectrodes in microfluidics: Cylovoltammetry, impedance spectroscopy for characterization of cells, cell cultures, immunoassays, and blood parameters
  • Surface acoustic wave-based microfluidic systems
  • Current research activities in Schnakenberg’s group

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Microwave Electronics

Content:

Functionality, design methods of analog and quick digital circuits

  • Introduction
  • Active microwave components
  • Microwave amplifiers
  • Mixers
  • Oscillators
  • Digital circuits with MESFETs
  • Filter synthesis
  • Transformators and baluns
  • Attenuators and phase shifters
  • RF circuit design
  • Microwave switches

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Nanoelectronic Devices

Content:

  • introduction to solid state physics fundamentals 
  • fundamentals of MOSFETs, electronic transport, 'top-of-the barrier'- model, on/off state 
  • FET scaling, short channel effects 
  • graphene (nanoribbon) FETs, band structure, electronic transport, metal-graphene contacts 
  • multi-gate transistors, nanowire FET, carbon nanotube and graphene FETs 
  • 1D MOSFETs, quantum phenomena 
  • ballistic transport, impact of scattering on electronic transport in transistors 
  • Schottky-barrier MOSFETs 
  • Band-to-band tunnel FETs 
  • introduction into the simulation of devices 

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Navigation for Safety-Critical Applications

Content:

  • Introduction to the determination of position and speed in safety critical applications
  • Propagation errors and their mitigation: multipath propagation, ionospheric effects, tropospheric effects, interference
  • Satellite error sources: clock errors, signal deformations, orbit errors
  • Integrity concepts for navigation: Bounding, monitoring, detection
  • Differential methods of satellite navigation
  • Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM)
  • Ground based augmentation systems (GBAS)
  • Space based augmentation systems (SBAS)
  • Methodologies for receiver-sided interference suppression
  • Carrier phase positioning
  • Inertial navigation and hybridization
  • Alternative Positioning Navigation and Timing (APNT)

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Novel Materials and Devices for Information Technology - Displays and Communication

Content:

This lecture discusses basic and current material and devices aspects based on the structure of a basic optical communication system. Data transmission via optical fiber and optical signal amplification is complemented by the used avtive optical devices. A short introduction into the field of III-V semiconductors and their heterostructures allows the discussion of important non-silicon devices like light-emitting diodes, laser diodes and high speed transistor devices.

The interface between (opto)electronic systems and humans is discussed by addressing the topics of cell-electronics coupling and in opposite direction by introducing the topics of color perception, lighting and display applications.

  • Compound semiconductor materials and devices
  • Organic semiconductors
  • Optical communications
  • Cell-electronics coupling
  • Displays

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Novel Materials and Devices for Information Technology - Logic and Memories

Content:

State variables for memories and processing of information; fundamental principles of logic and memory devices; physical limits of scaling (thermodynamic, quantum mechanical, electromagnetic limit)

  • Mesoscopic transport and interconnects
  • Charge-based memorys (DRAM, ferroelectric memories)
  • Magneto electronic memories
  • Redox-based and phase-change-based resistive memories
  • New mass storage concepts (scanning probe methods)
  • Alternative logic concepts (spintronics, OFETs, molecular electronics)
  • Architectural concepts for alternative logic and memory devices

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Numerical Device Simulation

Content:

Fundamentals of simulation of semiconductor devices used in nano-, micro- and power electronics

Lecture:

  • Properties of partial differential equations with flux conservation
  • Grids and discretization (finite differences and volumes, dual grids)
  • Solvers for systems of equations (linear and non-linear)
  • Drift-diffusion model (Scharfetter-Gummel stabilization, Gummel relaxation)
  • Transient simulation and stability (Euler method and backward differentiation formulas)
  • Analysis in the frequency domain (small-signal and harmonic balance)

Exercise: Implementation of a device simulator in MatLab.

Credits: 4           Contact hours per week: 3

Optical Telecommunications: Devices

Content:

We will cover the basics of electro-optic and photonic devices:

  • optical waveguides and optical modes of propagation,
  • planar photonic circuits,
  • coupled-mode theory and perturbation theory,
  • electro-optic modulators,
  • photodetectors,
  • optical amplifiers,
  • solid-state and semiconductor lasers.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Optical Telecommunications: Systems

Content:

We will cover:

  • optical receiver architectures,
  • basics of signal analysis,
  • bandwidth limitations and their compensation,
  • optical keying,
  • sources of noise in optical communication links,
  • fiber nonlinearities and the nonlinear Shannon limit,
  • metro and long-haul networks, fiber-to-the-home networks, datacom systems and their practical implementation,
  • quantum key distribution (as an outlook).

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Organic Electronics and Optoelectronics: Advanced Characterization, Physics and Devices

Content:

On the basis of prior knowledge on (opto) electronic devices and materials from part I of this lecture, the topics of this semester comprise special characterization techniques of organic semiconductor technology, specific aspects and applications as well as fundamental physical-technical basics in more detail. Current research topics such as non-linear optical phenomena, optical gain and lasing are part of the curriculum as well as electrochemistry, doping, holography and novel organic and hybrid devices.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Oxide Thin Films for Information Technology: Growth and Analysis

Content:

The lecture has the following content:

  • Overview over the physical properties of oxide thin films and their fields of application in information technology
  • Basics of thin film growth and methods for the deposition of oxide thin films
  • Defects in solids and thin films
  • Methods for the characterization of thin films
  • Working - and failure mechanisms of oxide thin film devices

The exercises contain a theoretical and a practical part where the knowledge of the lecture should be applied. The practical coursed take place at FZ Jülich (Transport with JARA Shuttle will be organized).

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Oxide Thin Films for Information Technology: Materials and Properties

Content:

The lecture has the following content:

  • Introduction into the physical properties of transition metal oxides
  • Polar properties of  oxide insulators and their fields of application
  • Metal-to-insulator transitions in oxides and their application for data storage
  • Multiferroic heterostructures and their application in information technology
  • Functional properties of Oxid-Heterointerfaces
  • Transparent conducting oxides
  • Oxide high temperature superconductors and their fields of application

The exercises contain a theoretical and a practical part where the knowledge of the lecture should be applied. The practical coursed take place at FZ Jülich (Transport with JARA Shuttle will be organized).

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Physical Sensors in Silicon Technology

Content:

The lecture “Physical Sensors in Silicon Technology” deals with the conception and the manufacturing methods of microsystems based on silicon fabrication technologies.

A microsystem is the combination of sensors, actuators and signal processing to a functional unit with structural dimensions in the micrometer range. To achieve this goal, methods of silicon technologies are applied. This allows benefiting from the large experience in microelectronics and ensures compatibility.

The first part of the lecture “Silicon-based Sensor and Actuator Systems” addresses operating principles of silicon-based microsensors and their implementation into marketable products. Current examples and applications will be presented.

Besides an introduction to the physics of semiconductor devices, the lecture comprises the field of physical sensors. In detail, the lecture is divided into the following areas: sensors for thermal signals, flow sensors, radiation sensors, magnetic field sensors, pressure sensors, MEMS microphones, sensor transponders, accelerometers and gyroscopes.

Presentation of the lecture:

  • Introduction to microsystem technology, attempt of definition, conceptualization of the different techniques
  • Introduction to the physics of semiconductor devices: atomic model, solid state, insulator, metal, semiconductor, band model, self-conduction, doping, p- and n-conductance, pn junction, diode, bipolar transistor, MOS transistor
  • Sensors for thermal signals: pn-junction, band gap, silicon temperature sensors, Pt-100 resistors, Ni-100 resistors, thermocouples
  • Flow sensors: Thermal properties of air and liquids, anemometry, air mass sensor, directional detection, pulsed operation
  • Sensors for radiation: visible light, CMOS-/ CCD-camera, color filter, IR and UV sensors
  • Magnetic field sensors: Hall effect, spinning current hallplate, magnetotransistors, magnetoresistivity, anisotropic magnetoresistive effect, flux gate sensor, GMR sensors, hard disk drive heads
  • Force and pressure sensors: strain gauges, capacitive pressure sensors, surface micromechanics, piezoelectric sensors, piezoresistive sensors, resonant structures, pressure sensor packaging, porous silicon
  • MEMS microphones and speakers: theory of vibration, electrostatic microphones, electret microphones, manufacturing processes, mikro speakers
  • Sensor transponders: basics of inductive telemetric systems, design, examples of pressure location transponders, retina stimulators and glucose sensors
  • Acceleration sensors: Theoretical basics, piezoresistive sensors in bulk micromechanics, capacitive sensors in surface micromechanics, sticking, thick EPI-Poly
  • Gyroscopes: rotation impulse maintenance, theory, embodiments

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Power Management Integrated Circuits

Content:

In Power Management Integrated Circuits (PMIC), all aspects of power supply concepts for integrated systems and low-power devices are addressed. For this purpose, the following fundamental topics are covered:

  • Active and passive monolithically integrated devices
  • Basic circuitry (e.g. level-shifter, H-bridge)
  • Biasing
  • Operational amplifiers and operational transconductance amplifiers (OTA)

Based on this, the following advanced topics are explained in detail with regard to state-of-the-art solutions:

  • Monolithically integrated voltage converters, multi-phase converters
  • Digital control of voltage converters
  • Efficient LED driving
  • Power management of complex systems and devices
  • Energy harvesting
  • Smart drivers for power transistors (e.g. IGBT, MOSFET, SIC)

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Quantum Simulations of Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Nano-ribbon Field-effect Transistors

Content:

The course starts with a presentation of the quantum mechanical foundation of the device simulation of carbon nanotube and graphene transistors based on the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. Subsequently, students will develop their own quantum simulation tool and will use this tool to investigate the impact of various transistor parameters on the device functionality.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Radar Systems

Content:

Radar Systems 1 addresses the design and basic aspects of radar systems Starting with the fundamentals:

  • History of radar
  • Radar principle
  • Radar equation for different cases
  • Radar displays, transmitters, and receivers
  • Pulse radar
  • CW radar and Doppler shift
  • FMCW radar

Further focus on:

  • Bistatic radar systems
  • Passive radar
  • Radiometry
  • Radar in Aviation
  • Weather radar
  • Automotive radar systems
  • SAR

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

RF Systems

Content:

Microwave engineering and their applications:

  • Introduction to wave propagation
  • Microwave radio relay
  • Communication satellites
  • Fundamentals of RADAR
  • Remote sensing
  • RF heating
  • Linearization techniques

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

RF Techniques and Circuits

Content:

In RFTC advanced RF transmission techniques and the related circuits are addressed from a physical point of view. In particular the limits of the implementation and realization are discussed for the following topics:

  • Modulation techniques from a physical point of view
  • Phase locked loops: Integer-N, fractional-N, All Digital PLL.
  • Architectures for receivers and transmitters
  • RF requirements of FDD systems
  • Introduction and comparison of different mobile and short-range wireless standards: LTE, UMTS, GSM, WLAN, WiMax, Bluetooth, ZigBee , DECT
  • RF-requirements of multi-band multi-standard radios
  • RF-Frontends for Software-Defined-Radio and Cognitive-Radio

Credits: 2          Contact hours per week: 3

Satellite Navigation

Content:

  • Introduction to radio based determination of position, time and velocity
  • Position and velocity estimation - Satellite constellations and orbits
  • Signals (modulation and coding) and navigation services (GPS and Galileo)
  • Signal acquisition and tracking
  • Discriminators for delay, frequency and phase as well as associated control loops and their implementation
  • Propagation errors and their mitigation: multipath, ionospheric effects, tropospheric effects, interference
  • Accuracy of position and time estimation
  • Reference systems for position and time
  • Relativistic corrections

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

Semiconductor Characterization

Content:

Starting from the previously acquired basic knowledge on semiconductor materials and devices, the most important electrical method for material and device characterization are covered. Beginning with elementary properties like sheet resistance, carrier concentration and mobility, device related parameters are discussed, in particular related to complex topics like defects and their parasitic impact on electronic devices. The various methods are approached pragmatically from the device engineer’s point of, focused on the functionality of the electronic device. The physical models on which the methods are based as well as their limitations and validity are discussed.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

VLSI Design for Digital Signal Processing - Architectures

Content:

  • Fundamental examples of architectures of digital signal processing, 
  • Digitale filters, 
  • Decimation and interpolation filters, 
  • Parallelization and multiple use of filters, 
  • linear and non-linear recursive structures, 
  • Parallelization and re- use of recursive structures, 
  • Selected current and examplary applications.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 3

 

Micro- and Nanoelectronics: Catalogue LABORATORY (4 Credits required)

Analog and Mixed Signal Electronic

Content:

In the AMS Design libratory the basic usage of a full custom IC-design framework is taught, simulation methods used in circuit design are introduced and frequently used circuit blocks for integrated analog designs are analyzed. Within 11 sessions the following circuit blocks are examined with simulation methods like DC-, AC-, Transient-, Periodic-Steady-State-, Noise-, Harmonic-Balance- und Periodic-AC-analysis:

  • Operational Amplifier
  • Low Drop Voltage Regulator
  • Buck Converter
  • Voltage Controlled Oscillator
  • Low Noise Amplifier
  • Frequency Mixer
  • Switched Capacitor Filter

The AMS Design laboratory uses the full custom IC-design framework from Cadence which is the industry standard in this field.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 4

CAD - Simulation of semiconductor devices

Content:

Fundamentals of semiconductor physics and numerics, usage of TCAD programs, simulation of production processes, simulation and analysis of devices

Applied simulation methods for the modeling of device operation: stationary simulation, small-signal simulation, mixed-mode simulation, transient simulation, electrothermal simulation, electro-optic simulation

Device types: pn-diodes, MOSFETs, bipolar junction transistor, photodiodes

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 4

Conception and Modeling of Opto-Electronic Devices

Content:

The laboratory class consists in a hands-on introduction to opto-electronic design flows and to commonly used CAD tools. It consists of following sessions:

  • Introduction to mode-solving for linear and curved waveguides (finite elements solvers, conformal mapping).
  • Modelling of active waveguides: Waveguide with embedded PIN diode.
  • Modelling of super-modes: Directional Coupler.
  • Introduction to 3D modeling of optical structures (Finite-Difference Time Domain and Beam Prop): Directional Coupler.
  • Modelling of co-propagating optical and RF waves: The phase matched high-speed phase shifter.
  • Analysis of complete Mach-Zehnder Electro-Optic Modulator (MZM).
  • Optical communication system modelling (MZM embedded in a network).
  • Thermal and mechanical modelling: The undercut, optically pumped microdisk laser.
  • The semiconductor laser: Quantum well gain medium (lecture).
  • Modelling of electrically pumped quantum well gain media.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 4

FPGA Design Technology

Content:

  • Introduction to basic principles of FPGA-architectures
  • Introduction to basic principles of hardware description languages (HDL) using the example of VHDL
  • Application of FPGA design software and simulators
  • Verification by means of testbench simulation
  • Programming of finite state machines
  • Implementation of exemplary applications such as a radio-controlled clock and real-time video processing

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 4

VLSI Design Technology

Content:

  • Introduction to the physically oriented design (mask layout design) of integrated digital CMOS-logic
  • Introduction to the design rules of a typical CMOS technology
  • Application of industry standard design software:

- Layout editor

- Schematic editor

- Design rule check

- Layout versus schematic check

- Extractor

  • Circuit simulation (SPICE)
  • Determination of the main circuit properties:

          - Propagation delay

          - Energy consumption

          - Area requirement

  •  Efficiency metrics and optimization of efficiency
  • Concept of basic cell design for datapath architectures
  • Circuit design based on standard-cell libraries
  • Verification by means of logic simulation

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 4

 

Micro- and Nanoelectronics: Catalogue PROJECT (4 Credits required)

Current Applications in Microsystem Technology

Content:

In the project "Current Applications in Microsystem Technology" narrowly defined scientific problems are developed in a small working group in a limited time. The results are presented by the participants in an appropriate form and with a documentation. The duration of a project corresponds to 4 hours per week and is assessed with 4 credit points.

The content of this course varies depending on the current research situation. For example, these can be microsystem technology projects in the field of simulation, assembly and connection technology, measuring station equipment or the production or characterization of microfluidics or MEMS technology chips.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 4

Innovative Components

Content:

In the module "Project Innovative Components" narrowly defined scientific problems are worked out in a small working group in a limited time. The results are presented in an appropriate form by the participants and are summarized in a written paper. The workload of a project corresponds to 4 SWS and is rated with 4 credit points.

The planning and division of labor is to be done by the group itself. The team is supported by the lecturer. The students are guided in the literature search, in the structuring and presentation of scientific contents, communication and team work. As part of the project management, the students specify which person is responsible for which part of the project.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 4

Integrated Digital Systems

Content:

In the “Project IDS“ clearly outlined technical / scientific problems from the field of digital integrated circuits and systems-on-chip are solved. Typical tasks are

  • CAD-supported layout design of integrated digital circuits or dedicated cell libraries,
  • development of optimized VLSI architectures for energy- and area-efficient components of digital signal processing systems,
  • FPGA-based prototyping,
  • design of components for test-chips on multi-project-wafers,
  • modelling of complex systems in MATLAB,
  • measurement and verification of fabricated test-chips on a wafer prober.

The tasks are derived from fields of application such as

  • communications technology, especially battery-powered devices,
  • WiFi / RF-ID, Internet-of-Things,
  • artificial neural nets,
  • global satellite navigation.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 4

Manufacturing Processes in Micro System Technology

Content:

In the project "Manufacturing Processes in Microsystem Engineering" narrowly defined scientific problems are developed in a small working group in a limited time. The results are presented by the participants in an appropriate form and with documentation. The duration of a project corresponds to 4 hours per week and is assessed with 4 credit points.

The content of this course varies depending on the current research situation. For example, these can be microsystem technology projects in the field of simulation, assembly and connection technology, measuring station equipment or the production or characterization of microfluidics or MEMS technology chips.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 4

Semiconductor Device Simulation

Content:

The students work alone or in small groups on a narrowly defined problem about semiconductor simulation, which is to be solved in a limited period. Suitable literature is provided at the beginning. Participants are expected to plan the course of work to a high degree independently but under the guidance of a supervisor.

Within the project, an algorithm is implemented to simulate a certain aspect of the physical behavior of a specific device. The results and the approach to the problem are documented in a report and presented in a talk.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 4

Sensor Technology in Practice

Content:

In the project "Sensor technology in practice " narrowly defined scientific problems are developed in a small working group in a limited time. The results are presented by the participants in an appropriate form and with a documentation. The duration of a project corresponds to 4 hours per week and is assessed with 4 credit points.

The content of this course varies depending on the current research situation. For example, these can be microsystem technology projects in the field of simulation, assembly and connection technology, measuring station equipment, circuit technology or the production or characterization of microfluidic or MEMS technology chips.

Credits: 4          Contact hours per week: 4